Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Lessons inspired by reading Missoula by Jon Krakauer

Mattie announced that she and Lexi will be hosting a new weekly link-up called "Weekly Lessons" every Wednesday.  Will I participate each week?  Probably not.  I'm terrible at weekly participation.  But, will I participate when I'm inspired with a lesson that I want to share?  You betcha.

How's this for a heavy subject for my first Weekly Lessons?  These are lessons that I learned while reading Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer.

It is no mystery to me that acquaintance rape, date rape, non-stranger rape (whatever you want to call it) is a problem in the society and culture of American college campuses. This book examines several stories of such incidents that occurred (or allegedly occurred) during 2010 to 2012 on one campus in one fairly smaller town of America. The BIG story here is Missoula is not the "rape capital" (because it is happening in so many other college towns as well; there was even one FBI reported noted that during the same time Missoula was actually below the national average for reported rapes.)  But, I feel this book accurately captures a slice of the American pie of incidents that are happening all across the country.

Sexual assault is emotional and difficult for so many involved. The VICTIM. The accused. The witnesses. The family of the victim. The friends of the victim. The family and friends of the accused. The community. The investigators. The prosecutors. The defenders. The university and its leaders. In this book, the football team. Its fans. Its players. Its coaches. I think this book adequately gives a picture of the fact that so many are involved. So many are impacted.

The book shows how victims are questioned, doubted, blamed, and verbally attacked. It shows how all too often sexual assaults are not brought to court, and if they are, how difficult it is to prove in a "he said, she said" debate. Political games are at play. Towns and communities are torn apart. Families and friends pick sides and even more hurt happens in the aftermath than the actual rape incident itself that is in question.

A great current event read, even if it did make me hurt, rage, cry, shout, and question if this issue can ever be effectively handled. Can we ever treat victims with the respect they deserve? Can we ever investigate thoroughly and accurately? Can we ever pass out deserved punishment to the offenders? I don't know...and that's a crime as well.


Much of this I "knew", somewhat, but compiled in this book, I learned so much more about the trauma of sexual assault.  Here are some of those lessons that I learned:

1.  "Rape and war...are among the most common causes of post-traumatic stress disorder, and survivors of sexual assault frequently exhibit many of the same symptoms and behaviors as survivors of combat: flashbacks, insomnia, nightmares, hypervigilance, depression, isolation, suicidal thoughts, outbursts of anger, unrelenting anxiety, and an inability to shake the feeling that the world is spinning out of control."  (page 380)

2.  It is extremely difficult to gather accurate statistics about rape and sexual assault.  The variances between different research studies from the U.S. Department of Justice to a different federal agency, the Center for Disease Control to research studies performed by analysts, journalists, doctors, psychiatrists, and psychologists.  It is difficult to discern the truth in all of the statistics.

3.  That being said, according to the CDC study using data gathered in 2011, it is estimated that "19.3 percent of American women 'have been raped in their lifetimes'".  Rough figures: 20+ million American women.  (Author's note, page xiii)

4.  A rape kit, when performed by a nurse, doctor, or nurse practicioner is painful, invasive, and traumatic.  A woman's "most private recesses" are "probed, combed, swabbed, photographed, and intensely scrutinized by strangers".  Often a video is taken of this exam as well and can take 4 or so hours to complete.  IF a case is ever investigated and goes to trial, these pictures and video will be viewed by another slew of strangers for intense examination and discussion.  (page 18)

5.  Politics all too often come in to play with what cases go to trial and what ones are determined that there isn't enough evidence to build a case.  Prosecutors want wins.  District Attorneys or Lead Prosecutors in County Attorney's Offices are elected officials.  Their constituents want a DA or Lead Prosecutor that provides wins.  Convictions.  That means that there are times that prosecutors pass on charging an accused rapist or attempting to take a court to trial because they are worried they won't get that "win".  

6.  Sometimes the media is frustrating. Sometimes they are vilified. Sometimes, good investigative journalists uncover newsworthy events that need to be brought to public attention. (Example:  the Academy Award winning movie, Spotlight, depicting "(t)he true story of how the Boston Globe uncovered the massive scandal of child molestation and cover-up within the local Catholic Archdiocese, shaking the entire Catholic Church to its core.")  Some stories challenge institutions, corporations, governments, and more, to no longer hide truths and mistreatments.

The following aren't exactly lessons that I learned from this book, but this book hit it home for me all over again:

7.  Another statistic that varies greatly, but it is reported that "at least 80 percent of those who are assaulted don't report the crime to authorities."  (Author's note, page xiv) 

8.  Out of the ones that are reported, few accused are actually charged with any crime.  Of those that go to trial, few are convicted. 

9.  Basically, if a person commits rape, the statistics are in strong favor that person will not be punished for the crime. 

This is one of several graphics out there discussing this very topic.  A few of them have been challenged for their validity.  But, most of them are pretty similar in their numbers.  I'm not claiming this one is perfect, but I do believe it depicts the very serious problem with sexual assault and the justice system.

SOURCE
Again, this isn't just happening in Missoula, Montana.  Brock Turner (convicted rapist, ex-Stanford swimmer) is a prime example of this being a problem in so many of America's college towns.  To me, that is why this book was such an important read.  The more we know, the better educated we are, the better equipped we are to combat the issues at hand.

Linking up with Mattie and Lexi for "Weekly Lessons".

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Semi-Charmed Summer Book Challenge 2016 Results


I have participated in FIVE of Megan's book challenges, and I've finished every one of them.  I'm not one that puts a ton of pressure on myself to finish, but this time, since I'd completed the previous four, I was feeling the pressure.  How did I do??

You can check out my list on goodreads...and here's a breakdown:

5 points: Freebie! Read any book that is at least 150 pages long:  
Dumplin' by Julie Murphy (375 pages) 5*/5 - completed June 12, 2016 - read review here

10 points: Read a collection of short stories or essays:
It's Complicated: Short Stories About Long Relationships by Karen Wright (250 pages) 4*/5 - completed July 14, 2016 - read review here

10 points: Read an adult fiction book written by an author who normally writes books for children. Examples: J. K. Rowling, Judy Blume, Suzanne Collins, Rick Riordan, etc. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Kelly E. - I gave up on Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling) after The Silkworm; still open to suggestions for this category: 
Some of Tim's Stories by S.E. Hinton - completed July 21, 2016 - read review here

15 points: Read a book set in Appalachia. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Ericka B. (Try this list or this one for inspiration. And here’s a map if you have a book in mind and want to know if it fits the setting.) -
The Truth According to Us by Annie Barrows - I've been on the library waitlist for ages; I'm next in line for the book; it was supposed to be available to me by the 30th of July; by the 19th of August, I decided to find another book to meet this category...so, I googled "books set in Appalachia" and picked this one...
One Foot in Eden by Ron Rash (224 pages) 3.75*/5 - completed August 20, 2016 - read review here

15 points: Don’t judge a book by its cover! Read a book with a cover you personally find unappealing. -
Running with Scissors by Augusten Burroughs (304 pages) 1*/5completed June 15, 2016 - read review here

20 points: Read a book that you have previously only seen the film (movie) of. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Bevchen. - This was one of the more difficult categories for me to select.  Often, I choose to read a book before the movie.  Or, if I've seen the movie without reading the book, I rarely go back to the book...because the images of the movie are strong in my mind:  
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne (224 pages) 5*/5 - completed August 8, 2016 - read review here

25 points: Read a book with a punny title. The title can be a play on another book title, movie title or a common expression. Examples of such titles include Southern Discomfort, We'll Always Have Parrots or Bonefire of the Vanities. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Jamie G. -
The Royal We by Heather Cocks & Jessica Morgan (454 pages) 5*/5 - completed June 10, 2016 - read review here

30 points: Read a microhistory. (Try this list or this one for ideas.) -
Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer (397 pages) 4.5*/5 - completed August 30, 2016 - read review here

30 points: Read one book with a good word in the title, and one with a bad word. Note: This category is reeeeeeeally open-ended! Maybe you like turtles, so The Pearl that Broke Its Shell is a title with a "good" word. Similarly, the "bad" word could be a swear word or a literally negative word like “not” or “none,” or it could just be something you don’t like. Have fun with it! (Remember, you must read both books to get 30 points; this category is not worth 15 points per book.)
LOVE/HATE
("Woman" = good word) The Kept Woman by Karin Slaughter (560 pages) 5*/5 - completed August 11, 2016 - read review here ...and ("Hate" = bad word) Hate List by Jennifer Brown (405 pages) - 4.5*/5 - completed August 16, 2016 - read review here

40 points: Read two books that contain the same word in the title, but once in the singular and once in the plural. For example: Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter and The Girl in the Red Coat by Kate Hamer, or Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff and The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. (Remember, you must read both books to get 40 points; this category is not worth 20 points per book.)
Not Without My Sister: The True Story of Three Girls Violated and Betrayed by Those They Trusted by Kristina Jones, Celeste Jones, and Juliana Buhring (432 pages) 4*/5 - completed June 24, 2016 -  read review here - and  The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt (328 pages) 4*/5 - completed June 18, 2016 - read review here

I did it!  I finished...on the very last day!

Monday, August 29, 2016

Take a look...

Do y'all know the lovely Kaity at (Bee)autiful Blessings?  She's about to have her second bambino any day now (in fact from the time I type this to the post going live, she may have), so she's asked for a few guest posts to entertain her blogger buddies while she's a *little* busy with other important things. 

Kaity is another book lovin' book challenge fan, so, you know, she asked me to talk about one of my favorite subjects ~ BOOKS!  Go take a look..............


Sunday, August 28, 2016

Sunday's Seven Snapshots vol.87

My library haul this week is even color coordinated. 

Tickets purchased for February's Gun N Roses show

View from the library...not bad, huh?

Speaking of "not bad"........this donut is 100% vegan. That means it's good for me, right?

SPRING is coming!  My favorite season!

Spent the weekend showcasing jewellery at a Spring Festival. They hosted an exquisite art show as well. 

These giraffes by kindergarten students were my absolute faves!

Hope you had a wonderful week!

Friday, August 26, 2016

Aussie Author Challenge: Book 9


The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood:

One of my great friends who is a lover of books praised this book and gave it to me as a birthday gift.  This recommendation alone had me intrigued. 

Also, it is receiving much praise from the Australian literary community, and it is on the shortlist for this year's Miles Franklin Award, which is Australia's "most prestigious literary award".  I must admit, I'm not always a reader/fan of these "prestigious" books...but I was still intrigued.

When I finished this book, I immediately wrote "So many thoughts.  So many questions.  So many emotions.  I need to digest."  After a couple of days, I still feel that way.  Adequately sharing my thoughts might prove difficult, but I will try.

First, I'll share this short clip from goodreads:  "The Natural Way of Things is a gripping, starkly imaginative exploration of contemporary misogyny and corporate control, and of what it means to hunt and be hunted."

Americans, do you remember the disappearance of Chandra Levy?  At the age of 24, she was reported as a missing person.  During the investigation, it was learned that she "allegedly" was having an affair with a married U.S. Congressman.  Reportedly, when questioned, this man seemed evasive and more concerned with saving his own face and reputation, rather than concern over Miss Levy's whereabouts and safety.

Hypothetically, in a fictitious world, what if it was arranged to just have someone like Chandra Levy "sent away"?  Removed from the society that she lived in and muddied the waters with her existence due to such a sexual scandal?  Punished for her promiscuous behaviour?  (Again, not my thoughts...this is for the sake of a work of fiction.)  That's the premise of this book.

Young women that are connected by a variety of popular, news-worthy sexual scandals (gang rape by football players, sexual harassment and relations with a judge on a singing reality competition show, an affair with a politician and more) are drugged and seemingly, kidnapped, taken to a place that I can only describe as similar to a concentration camp.  They live in horrendous conditions with no real knowledge of how they got there or what will happen to them.  What they do know:  "The reason for their captivity has a blank clarity: they are hated." (Pg 171)

The story is captivating.  The reader experiences the women's descent into madness, their quest for survival or revenge.  There are many, many passages that are extremely difficult to stomach, but they are an adequate description of the conditions these women were forced to face.  I couldn't help but question how I, personally, would/could handle such conditions.  I could see myself going either way...losing my sanity, becoming engrossed with revenge, doing what needed to be done to survive, or just wanting to give up.  While reading and following the journey, I felt such a range of emotions from anger and disgust to triumph and hopefulness. 

Without saying too much more, about the story itself, one of the lessons that shall stick with me from this story is this (broken down in simplest form):  Life can be tough and extremely challenging, but it is always best to be in charge of one's own journey.

http://bookloverbookreviews.com/reading-challenges/aussie-author-challenge-2016

It's the 7th year for the Aussie Author Challenge, and my 2nd year participating (click on the picture/link to take you directly to the site for more information).  My working book list is as follows:

Female Authors:

Male Authors:

Authors New to Me:

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Significant Songs from Live Shows: A Jana and Erin Playlist


Last Thursday of the month means it's time for another playlist with Jana  and Erin - a playlist with a twist.  Often, we try not to choose themes that you've seen time and time again.  This month we've decided to highlight significant songs from concerts we've attended AND that concert was monumental to us for one reason or another. 

JANA:  1. "The Right Stuff" by NKOTB. New Kids and Tiffany was the first concert I ever went to. With my parents, sister, best friend at the time and we saw them at Westbury Music Fair. I was in 4th or 5th grade (roughly the same age as my daughter, incidentally, who just went to her first concert this past summer. We took her to see Weezer. So there's that). And my love of live music begins. 

ERIN:  2.  "You Give Love a Bad Name" by Bon Jovi.  I know.  It comes as no surprise that Bon Jovi makes an appearance on this list.  It was my first concert that I attended.  My mother took three 8th grade girls and one 7th grader to the Bon Jovi "Slippery When Wet" tour with Cinderella opening (who became another live favorite).  My love of Bon Jovi was cemented.

JANA:  3. "Big Talk" by Warrant. NKOTB was the first concert I ever attended; Warrant and Poison at Nassau Coliseum was the first concert I attended sans parents. Three of my friends and I went during the Cherry Pie tour and looking back, there were quite a lot of things that happened at that concert I didn't quite understand. Now I do. Warrant was DIRTY.

ERIN:  4.  "King of Rock" by Run DMC - The summer after 8th grade, I went to visit my grandparents in rural East Texas.  A concert was coming to the Oil Palace in Tyler, Texas ... a concert like this smaller Texas town had never seen - Run DMC with others (DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince, Public Enemy, and more).  My aunt and uncle took me, they sat in the back while I bounced and danced in the crowd.  My uncle claimed that my blond ponytail was easy to spot.  I loved the blend of sounds (and still do) that Run DMC brings, and King of Rock is especially foreshadowing since they are now members of the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame.

JANA:  5. "Subdivisions" by Rush. This is my absolute favorite Rush song of all time. We might have used it in a post before but #idontcare. I saw Rush for the first time in 1991ish (mostly because Mr. Big was the opening act. Yes, I was that person but in my defense, I was 14) and despite being there for the opening act, I walked away a Rush fan. This was also the gateway concert for my love affair with outdoor concerts. Thank you, Jones Beach.

ERIN:  6.  "Crackerman" by Stone Temple Pilots.  My college roommate, Katy, dated a beautiful boy named Gregorio.  We piled into my white Honda Civic and drove from our university town to Houston for my first "live" experience with Stone Temple Pilots (1995ish).  It was an incredible show, even with Scott Weiland completely off his face.  Since his death from a deadly cocktail of drugs, this first STP is particularly poignant to me in my memories.

JANA:  7. "Tainted Angel" by Southgang. I saw these guys on New Year's Eve. In a bar. In Atlanta. When I was 14 (14 was a big year, evidently). It was pretty fucking cool.(Also, I might or might not have thrown this in because of Erin's love for Butch Walker. I'll let you decide).

ERIN:  8.  "Best Thing You Never Had" by Butch Walker. No, this ain't no BeyoncĂ© song.  Jana mentioned my love for Butch, and my entry above talks about my friend, Katy...so, let me tell you about the time that Katy and I went to Vegas to "celebrate" her divorce.  The Wynn just opened, and we scored an amazing deal on a room.  We went to see the male dance revue, American Storm, and we had cocktails by the pool.  I told Katy that she needed to trust me - we were going to see Avril Lavigne at The Joint at the Hard Rock because there was this musician that was opening that I had to see...Mr. Butch Walker.  Seeing this song live is damn near close to a religious experience for me.  He's touring right now.  Seriously.  If you like live music, do yourself a favor and go see him if he's coming to a town near you. 

JANA:  9. "Ain't Going Down Till the Sun Comes Up" by Garth Brooks. I bought my husband, then-boyfriend, tickets to see Garth Brooks in Philly for his 20th birthday. Decidedly not a country music fan, I had a lot of trepidation going to the show. Turns out, I can be wrong. This still reigns as one of the best concerts I've ever attended. The man played for 3 hours WITH NO BREAK. It was incredible. Also at that concert, the guy selling "popcorn, peanuts, crack cocaine".   (Note from Erin: While watching this video as I was putting together this post, I got goosebumps.  His energy is infectious.  Garth is the bomb.  No shame.)

ERIN:  10.  "Between Angels and Insects" by Papa Roach.  Another time that I told a friend to "just trust me" and go to a show with me was to see Papa Roach.  Their first full album was out, and "Last Resort" was a single getting play.  I had the album (well, cd, but I still call them albums), and I wanted to see them live.  I convinced my friend, Shawn, to go with me because he likes rock shows.  When we left the show, we looked like someone had hosed us down with a garden hose.  We were soaked with sweat.  I am not sure I've ever lost that many calories in one show.  I picked this song because it was the one that I remember most for the crowd losing.their.shit when it played. 

JANA:  11. "Captain Jack" by Billy Joel. Returning the favor, the husband bought me tickets to see Billy Joel and Elton John. I had previously seen Billy during college but attending this concert was the fulfillment of a decade long dream. Dueling pianos at their finest. 

ERIN:  12.  "Here Is Gone" by the Goo Goo Dolls.  My two frontmen loves are Jon Bon Jovi and Johnny Rzeznik.  In 2003, they made this girl's dream come true by touring together.  And, the Goo Goo Dolls were touring to support my favorite album of theirs, Gutterflower. 

JANA:  13. "Jesus of Suburbia" by Green Day. Perhaps the greatest song from American Idiot, and perhaps one of the most stellar shows I've attended. By the time we got to their concert at the Liacouras Center, we'd seen Green Day 3 times and this concert was about as close to perfection as you can get. 

ERIN:  14.  I couldn't decide what song/band I wanted to list next, and "Gone Away" by The Offspring came on, which instantly took me to a memory that I love, so there you have it.  One of my best gal pals moved to Italy.  I went to visit.  We went to see The Offspring in Milan.  It was an unforgettable experience to go to a concert surrounded by Italians all singing along in English with this SoCal pop punk band. 

JANA:  15. "Absolutely Still" by Better Than Ezra. Laugh if you will, but I love these guys. And I loved, LOVED seeing them at Power Plant Live in Baltimore. FOR FREE, Y'ALL. Of course it was on the hottest day Baltimore has ever had and my sweet tea crush melted but still. Awesome. There's something about going to see a once popular band but who wasn't really that popular and who's a little past their prime because you know all the fans are FANS. And they covered a Rush song.

ERIN:  16.  "Angel Eyes (I'll Never Let You Go)" by Steelheart.  Talk about seeing bands a little past their prime........I went to the inaugural Rocklahoma in 2007.  Glam bands, hair bands, hair metal, call them what you want.  My love for them will never die.  I was joined in a field smack in the middle of nowhere Oklahoma by others who still loved this music too.  We met people from different countries, different states, and different ages.  Many "big" names from this era were there (Poison, RATT, Quiet Riot, Twisted Sister, Vince Neil, Dokken, more) - but, when the lead singer of Steelheart belted out this song and still hit those notes, it is safe to say that the crowd was blown away.

JANA:  17. "Enemies" by Shinedown. Going all the way back to two weeks ago when I attended Carnival of Madness. I can't even properly convey how I felt this concert in my bones. In my soul. Shinedown's music speaks to me like no other band's and to see them live...well, I can't quite process it all yet, never mind write about it. AND. As if the concert wasn't amazing enough, they opened up their set with Let's Go Crazy. The real Prince version. Not a cover. 

ERIN:  18.  "All out of Love" by Air Supply.  They started their career over 40 years ago playing in Sydney restaurants.  I saw them play at the Sydney Opera House.  Let me tell you, there is something to be said for any band that can stay together for 40 years (the duo claim they've never even had a fight) and can fill a room full of people who will sing all of their songs word for word back to them. 

We left out plenty that we wanted to add, but this is no longer about us...tell us about your live music experience and a significant song from a monumental concert in your musical journey.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

#Fav7Films times two

Twitter circulated a hashtag: #Fav7Films.  If I wasn't such a lame blogger, I'd take a couple of minutes and attempt to find how/why this hashtag began, or who started it, but I'm lame lazy. 

I participated and rattled off my #Fav7Films, published the tweet, then thought "wait, but, what about........" and felt I needed to list seven more.  So, I did.  Really, do I need to follow any "rules" when it comes to twitter hashtags?  No.  So, I rattled off seven more. 

I started thinking about these movies and this exercise.  What I liked about it is that I didn't put much thought into it.  I spilled out fourteen movies that I think of as my "favorites", and in that quick, fun tweet(s), I think I came up with a pretty solid list (for me).  So, I thought I'd share them with you.

Plus, it's a good time to talk about movies because jenn's "fall film challenge" begins next week.

Love Actually - It makes me laugh, and it makes me cry.  It makes me enjoy a different storyline or actor or character almost every time I watch it.  I always end with a full heart after watching it, and there's not much better a feeling than a full heart.

The Outsiders - The only piece of poetry that I can recite from memory is the Robert Frost poem that Pony Boy recites in this movie.  My heart loves this movie so much.  Patrick Swayze is so wonderful in so many films, but his supporting role in this one is my fave.  And, I love Cherry Valance (Diane Lane).  And, Matt Dillon as Dallas Winston.  And, Soda Pop and Two Bit.  And, of course, Johnny and Pony Boy.  Oh, and did I mention Tom Cruise is in it (before an agent got a hold of him and made him fix his teeth)?

Urban Cowboy - Stereotypes exist for a reason, because sometimes there is some truth to them.  I have a friend in Texas.  Her parents met at Gilley's.  Her father was a bullrider in his 20s.  Her mother was an underage teen that snuck into the bar.  They married after knowing each other for only 2 weeks.  They are still together with two children and three grandchildren.  This movie is a slice of Texas life and culture that I cherish.  No, the domestic violence and adultery aren't pretty, but they are real.
Notice John Travolta's white boots with brown tips on the toes.  Yep, I had some.

Grease 2 - Stephanie Zinone is so much cooler than Sandy.  I wanted to be Stephanie Zinone.  In the first Grease, Sandy had to change to snag her guy finally.  In Grease 2, a guy had to change to get a girl.  I like that.  Plus, I like the songs better.  And, Maxwell Caulfield is dreamier than John Travolta.

Almost Famous - For someone like myself who feels like some music really speaks to them...or that some of their favorite musicians are "friends", this movie is wonderful and poignant.

Good Will Hunting - Another movie that makes me laugh and makes me cry and is filled with life lessons.  Robin Williams at his finest.  And, hey, that Matt Damon guy and Ben Affleck dude are pretty good too.

The Fox and the Hound - I've mentioned before that this is my all-time favorite Disney movie.  My love of animals and the story of friendship makes me continue to love it, even as an adult. 

Moulin Rouge - The music.  The colors.  The costumes.  The story.  Satine & Christian.  Nicole Kidman and Ewan McGregor.  I love all of this movie. 

Sleepers - This story stuck with me.  The cast and performances are fantastic.  The question of right and wrong...who are the "bad" guys and who are the "good" ones in this particular story is one that is thought-provoking.

A Time to Kill - This movie punches me in the gut every time I see it.  Who won Oscars and Golden Globes that year?  I don't know.  What I do know is Samuel L. Jackson should have.

Pretty in Pink - I adore John Hughes movies with Molly Ringwald as his muse, but this one is my favorite.  James Spader is particularly slimy.  And, really, who doesn't love Duckie?

Brian's Song - I can not watch this movie without sobbing like a baby.  Based on the true story of the life and friendship of Chicago Bears players Brian Piccolo and Gale Sayers.

Less Than Zero - I don't really know if I thought much about acting skills until I saw this movie and Robert Downey Jr.'s performance.  Oh, and slimy James Spader makes another appearance.  It's a cautionary tale that "drugs are real bad".

She's the One - I'm a fan of Edward Burns.  There is something miserable, yet comical about this movie.  The familial relationships and love interests are dysfunctional and authentic.

I've got some honorable mentions...but, like I said, for a quick off-the-cuff response, I think this is pretty great reflection of my #Fav7Films. 

What do you think?

Quick.  Don't think too hard.  Tell me your #Fav7Films.